1. scienceisbeauty:

Image from jet noise simulation. A new design for an engine nozzle is shown in gray at left. Exhaust temperatures are in red/orange. The sound field is blue/cyan. Chevrons along the nozzle rim enhance turbulent mixing to reduce noise.
Credit: Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University
Source (Phys.Org)

    scienceisbeauty:

    Image from jet noise simulation. A new design for an engine nozzle is shown in gray at left. Exhaust temperatures are in red/orange. The sound field is blue/cyan. Chevrons along the nozzle rim enhance turbulent mixing to reduce noise.

    Credit: Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University

    Source (Phys.Org)

    1 year ago  /  67 notes  /  Source: scienceisbeauty

  2. comedycentral:

The green is festive, don’t you think?

    comedycentral:

    The green is festive, don’t you think?

    1 year ago  /  590 notes  /  Source: comedycentral

  3. wildcat2030:

A 3D PRINTED SPACESHIP ON THE SCALE OF A HUMAN HAIR? HELLO NANOSCRIBE 3D PRINTER
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3D printing has become one of the most exciting and talked about technologies of 2013. The ability for the masses to make almost any object not only fuels imagination but challenges modern consumerism and its supply chain. While some enthusiasts continue to showcase the technology by producing toys, cars, and even guns in their garage, others look to 3D printing to manufacture the next generation of electronics, whether for mobile applications, medical devices, or wearable computing.
Regardless of the application, the challenge in manufacturing at the submicron scale is fabricating structures in a precise, rapid, and consistent fashion. Even though 3D printing is just getting started, the race for the fastest, most capable printer is already on.
Last year, a group of researchers at the Vienna University of Technology in Austria refined a 3D printing technique that allowed the construction of sophisticated structures (an F1 racecar and a cathedral) smaller than dust mites in about 4 minutes. Now, a company called Nanoscribe GmbH that emerged from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany has made a 3D printer called the Photonic Professional GT which can produce detailed structures on a similar scale but faster.
In fact, the technique was able to produce a spaceship (from the Wing Commander line of video games) from a CAD file that measures 125µm x 81µm x 26.8µm (on the order of the width of a human hair) in less than 50 seconds. (via A 3D Printed Spaceship On The Scale Of A Human Hair? Hello Nanoscribe 3D Printer | Singularity Hub)

    wildcat2030:

    A 3D PRINTED SPACESHIP ON THE SCALE OF A HUMAN HAIR? HELLO NANOSCRIBE 3D PRINTER

    -

    3D printing has become one of the most exciting and talked about technologies of 2013. The ability for the masses to make almost any object not only fuels imagination but challenges modern consumerism and its supply chain. While some enthusiasts continue to showcase the technology by producing toys, cars, and even guns in their garage, others look to 3D printing to manufacture the next generation of electronics, whether for mobile applications, medical devices, or wearable computing.

    Regardless of the application, the challenge in manufacturing at the submicron scale is fabricating structures in a precise, rapid, and consistent fashion. Even though 3D printing is just getting started, the race for the fastest, most capable printer is already on.

    Last year, a group of researchers at the Vienna University of Technology in Austria refined a 3D printing technique that allowed the construction of sophisticated structures (an F1 racecar and a cathedral) smaller than dust mites in about 4 minutes. Now, a company called Nanoscribe GmbH that emerged from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany has made a 3D printer called the Photonic Professional GT which can produce detailed structures on a similar scale but faster.

    In fact, the technique was able to produce a spaceship (from the Wing Commander line of video games) from a CAD file that measures 125µm x 81µm x 26.8µm (on the order of the width of a human hair) in less than 50 seconds. (via A 3D Printed Spaceship On The Scale Of A Human Hair? Hello Nanoscribe 3D Printer | Singularity Hub)

    1 year ago  /  156 notes  /  Source: singularityhub.com

  4. wildcat2030:

This vast habitat is the world’s largest freshwater wetland - an immense, landlocked river delta covering large part of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul and tracts of Bolivia and Paraguay.
Each year this enormous basin is engulfed with rainwater bringing with them an amazing diversity of life to the dry grasslands. Here, jaguars, tapirs and macaws rub shoulders with thousands of other species of bird, reptile, mammal and fish, making it one of the most diverse places on the planet. Yet, the Pantanal is much more than a magical wetland. It also acts like a giant sponge, slowly releasing the flood water throughout the year and helping to protect millions of people further downstream. But now, changes to agriculture threaten this astonishing landscape. (via BBC - Future - Science & Environment - Pantanal: Liquid heart of South America)tur

    wildcat2030:

    This vast habitat is the world’s largest freshwater wetland - an immense, landlocked river delta covering large part of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul and tracts of Bolivia and Paraguay.

    Each year this enormous basin is engulfed with rainwater bringing with them an amazing diversity of life to the dry grasslands. Here, jaguars, tapirs and macaws rub shoulders with thousands of other species of bird, reptile, mammal and fish, making it one of the most diverse places on the planet. Yet, the Pantanal is much more than a magical wetland. It also acts like a giant sponge, slowly releasing the flood water throughout the year and helping to protect millions of people further downstream. But now, changes to agriculture threaten this astonishing landscape. (via BBC - Future - Science & Environment - Pantanal: Liquid heart of South America)tur

    1 year ago  /  88 notes  /  Source: bbc.com

  5. ecocides:

Early birds flew on four wings
Instead of two wings, the first birds might have used four feathered limbs to stay aloft, according to research
Birdlike dinosaurs, such as Microraptor and Sinornithosaurus, are known to have had long, sturdy feathers on their hindlimbs. But until now, researchers were not sure whether the earliest birds had already abandoned this extra plumage when they emerged to take to the Cretaceous skies over 100 million years ago. (Read more)
| image: SCIENCE/AAAS

    ecocides:

    Early birds flew on four wings

    Instead of two wings, the first birds might have used four feathered limbs to stay aloft, according to research

    Birdlike dinosaurs, such as Microraptor and Sinornithosaurus, are known to have had long, sturdy feathers on their hindlimbs. But until now, researchers were not sure whether the earliest birds had already abandoned this extra plumage when they emerged to take to the Cretaceous skies over 100 million years ago. (Read more)

    | image: SCIENCE/AAAS

    1 year ago  /  297 notes  /  Source: rorschachx

  6. woodendreams:

(by Mick Byrne)

    woodendreams:

    (by Mick Byrne)

    1 year ago  /  4,241 notes  /  Source: Flickr / mickydazzler

  7. allthingseurope:

Eilean Donan Castle, Scotland (by gmj49)

    allthingseurope:

    Eilean Donan Castle, Scotland (by gmj49)

    1 year ago  /  2,211 notes  /  Source: Flickr / gmj49

  8. afternoonsnoozebutton:

What a difference 8 years makes: St. Peter’s Square in 2005 and yesterday

    afternoonsnoozebutton:

    What a difference 8 years makes: St. Peter’s Square in 2005 and yesterday

    (via greenfuturist)

    1 year ago  /  307 notes  /  Source: afternoonsnoozebutton

  9. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    1 year ago  /  581 notes  /  Source: reddit.com

  10. allthingseurope:

Spis Castle, Slovakia (by Matt Jevons)

    allthingseurope:

    Spis Castle, Slovakia (by Matt Jevons)

    1 year ago  /  2,662 notes  /  Source: 500px.com

  11. hitrecord:

“Regret”
Photo by chrismckenney

    hitrecord:

    “Regret”

    Photo by chrismckenney

    1 year ago  /  284 notes  /  Source: hitrecord

  12. mothernaturenetwork:

10 places on Earth that resemble alien planets

    mothernaturenetwork:

    10 places on Earth that resemble alien planets

    1 year ago  /  365 notes  /  Source: mothernaturenetwork

  13. thisistheverge:

Ziphius aquatic drone launching on Kickstarter soon (hands-on)
As the world of remote control devices inexorably turns into a world of drones, the distinction between the two might be a little fuzzy to most people. So you might be forgiven if you take the Ziphius as little more than a cute, remotely-controlled boat. That’s not the case at all, though, as this little device has a Raspberry Pi computer inside and an adjustable video-camera up front. In normal use, you control it from an iOS or Android device, directing the motors with your left thumb and adjusting the camera above and below the waterline with your right 

    thisistheverge:

    Ziphius aquatic drone launching on Kickstarter soon (hands-on)

    As the world of remote control devices inexorably turns into a world of drones, the distinction between the two might be a little fuzzy to most people. So you might be forgiven if you take the Ziphius as little more than a cute, remotely-controlled boat. That’s not the case at all, though, as this little device has a Raspberry Pi computer inside and an adjustable video-camera up front. In normal use, you control it from an iOS or Android device, directing the motors with your left thumb and adjusting the camera above and below the waterline with your right 

    1 year ago  /  40 notes  /  Source: theverge.com

  14. mothernaturenetwork:

Arctic gets greener as climate warms, says NASA
Large patches of lush vegetation in the Arctic now stretch over an area about the size of the continental United States.

    mothernaturenetwork:

    Arctic gets greener as climate warms, says NASA

    Large patches of lush vegetation in the Arctic now stretch over an area about the size of the continental United States.

    1 year ago  /  110 notes  /  Source: mothernaturenetwork